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Watermelon sorbet

Watermelon sorbet

Comments: This recipe is from Alton Brown’s Good Eats series. The DVD title was ‘The Ripe Stuff”.  Watch it for a very entertaining view on the science behind the sugar.  We do not have an ice cream freezer. Instead, I use Step 3b : I pour the mixture into a small glass dish and put it directly into the freezer.  Every hour for the next three hours, I take it out and whip it to break up all of the ice crystals. This helps to give it a smoother texture. After the first three hours, I let it finish freezing.  Texture-wise, it is best on the first night.  Otherwise, you will probably want to let it sit in the serving bowls  for about 10 minutes to soften up to a more sorbet like consistency.  Also, we’ve been experimenting with different amounts of sugar versus alcohol.  Both the sugar and the alcohol help to keep the sorbet from becoming a solid block of ice.  You don’t want to decrease one without increasing the other.  The first night, the only alcohol we had in the house was dark rum – it made for a nice sorbet if you like rum because you could really taste it! We recently experimented with a combination of midori and vodka – that was quite good! I’ll come back and update when I think I’ve got the proportions just right for our taste!

Ingredients

1 pound, 5 ounces of diced watermelon (or muskmelon, or honeydew)

3 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice

2 tbsp vodka

9 ounces sugar (approximately 1 1/4 cups)

Preparation

1. Place the melon in the bowl of a food processor and process until smooth.

2. Add the lemon, juice, vodka, and sugar and process for another 30 seconds.

3a. If using an ice cream maker, place the mixture into the refrigerator until it reaches 40 degrees F; this could take between 30 minutes and an hour.  Pour the mixture into the bowl of an ice cream maker and process according to manufacturers instructions.

3b. If not using an ice cream maker, pout into a freezer safe dish. Stir at least every hour for the first three hours being sure to completely break up all of the ice crystals that are forming. After three hours, just let it freeze until ready to eat.

4. For storage, transfer to an airtight container and  place in the freezer.

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